Which league’s TV ratings declined the most after the World Cup?


This post is by Christopher Harris from World Soccer Talk


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




< !DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40/loose.dtd">

The name of the game for soccer leagues shown on US television is to figure out a way to take advantage of the hype and interest in a men’s World Cup tournament, and to attract those viewers to their respective leagues after the FIFA tournament is over.

According to research by World Soccer Talk, some leagues did better than others after the 2018 FIFA World Cup ended.

Before diving into the statistics, though, we first need to mention that there are two important factors happening after a World Cup tournament. (1) the viewing figures for league games will dwindle in comparison to the TV ratings that the World Cup itself gets, so there’s bound to be a big drop-off. And (2) there is sometimes a burnout factor for sports fans who want to take a break from watching 3-4 games a day, every day, for an entire month during the

Continue reading “Which league’s TV ratings declined the most after the World Cup?”

Hugo Lloris forgets World Cup to concentrate on glory days at Tottenham


This post is by David Hytner from Football | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The goalkeeper believes that Mauricio Pochettino’s side can keep the pressure on the Premier League leaders

It was the fulfilment of the ultimate footballing fantasy. Only 20 men had done it previously, each one a titan, a name to stir awe and respect. Think of Bobby Moore and Carlos Alberto, Franz Beckenbauer and Diego Maradona. On a tumultuous evening in Moscow last July, Hugo Lloris became the 21st, when he hoisted aloft the World Cup as the captain of France.

It was an occasion of high drama, with even the elements reinforcing the feel of a primal epic – thunder, lightning and tipping rain framing France’s 4-2 win over Croatia. When Lloris got his hands on the trophy, and fireworks and golden confetti lit the scene, it was tempting to wonder how he could possibly drink it all in.

Continue reading…

Tom Jenkins’s best sports photos of 2018


This post is by Tom Jenkins for the Guardian and the Observer from Football | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The Guardian and Observer sport photographer Tom Jenkins selects his favourite images from the thousands of frames that he shot during 2018 and recalls the stories behind them

20mm lens 1/2000 f4 ISO 3200

Continue reading…

2018 in football tactics: France and Real Madrid did it their way | Jonathan Wilson


This post is by Jonathan Wilson from Football | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Press and possess is the method of many leading teams but Didier Deschamps’ side in Russia and Real Madrid before them picked up the biggest prizes playing in their own mannerThe same basics everywhere: it would be easy to believe that football in 2018 was about the victory of press and possess. Manchester City do it, Liverpool do it, Tottenham do it, Chelsea do it, Arsenal do it, Barcelona do it, Juventus do it, Napoli do it, Bayern Munich do it, Borussia Dortmund do it, even Paris Saint-Germain have been showing signs of doing it under Thomas Tuchel. Manchester United didn’t do it and José Mourinho was sacked after a grim opening to the season in which his ideas had seemed increasingly outmoded.

And yet the two biggest competitions of the year were won by teams that did not play in that way. Try to find a pattern based Continue reading “2018 in football tactics: France and Real Madrid did it their way | Jonathan Wilson”

Gareth Bale targets Club World Cup final glory after 11-minute hat-trick in semi – video


This post is by Football | The Guardian from Football | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Gareth Bale scored a sensational hat-trick as Real Madrid began their quest for a third successive Club World Cup by beating Kashima Antlers 3-1. Real struggled to create in the first half against Kashima until Bale broke the deadlock a minute before the break. The former Tottenham man collected the ball wide on the left and, following a stylish one-two with left-back Marcelo, slotted home via the right post. Real cruised through to Saturday’s final, where they will face Al-Ain after the UAE side’s shock penalty shootout victory over the Copa Libertadores champions River Plate on Tuesday.

Gareth Bale’s 11-minute hat-trick fires Real Madrid into Club World Cup final

Continue reading…

What happened next? How the World Cup brought in a new era for Alex Scott – and women in football


This post is by Alexandra Topping from Football | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




She had already earned 140 caps for England, but Scott became one of the breakout stars of the men’s tournament this year as the first woman pundit taken to a World Cup by the BBC. She reveals why it wasn’t all plain sailing

Alex Scott is not alone in looking back at the long hot summer of 2018 with a pronounced sense of nostalgia. But for the former Arsenal right back, who herself won 140 caps for England, it holds particularly cherished memories: she became the first female football pundit ever taken to a World Cup by the BBC.

The Champions League winner and six-time Premier League champion saw a fearless England side ride a wave of uncharacteristic national optimism to the semi-final of the World Cup in Russia.

Continue reading…

Ivan Rakitic: ‘We saw Football’s Coming Home and thought: yeah, but you still have to play us’


This post is by Sid Lowe from Football | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The Barcelona and Croatia midfielder talks about playing England at the World Cup with a virus, how to stay calm when taking penalties and post-tournament exhaustionIvan Rakitic packed his bag, kissed his family goodbye and said see you on the 15th. It was early June and he was not planning to be back until mid-July, four days after his daughter’s birthday. His wife, Raquel Mauri, told him he had better explain, so he made a promise: “I told her: ‘Don’t worry, when it’s over we’ll have a big party,’” he grins. “And I kept my word.” The day Althea turned five, he was still in Moscow. That night he called, wished her happy birthday and said sorry: daddy wasn’t coming home just yet. He had a World Cup final to play.

Related: Croatia stun Spain to set up Nations League decider against England

Continue reading…

Football’s super-rich play the game by their own rules | David Goldblatt


This post is by David Goldblatt from Football | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The Football Leaks revelations show how little the views of fans and regulators matterWikiLeaks shone a light on the duplicity of US foreign policy. The Panama Papers laid bare the network of offshore banking, tax havens and legal loopholes that allows the global super-rich, political dynasties in authoritarian states and organised crime to (the bounds of all three being pretty fluid) hide their capital. But it may just be that Football Leaks, a website with a trove of insider contacts, astounding documents and very secure servers, will be the best guide to the malfeasance of the global economy and our crumbling international order.

In 2016, the site released documents, in association with Der Spiegel and a consortium of European media outlets, that made clear the widespread nature of illegal secret payments and tax avoidance in both the transfer market and in the ways clubs paid players’ salaries, not to Continue reading “Football’s super-rich play the game by their own rules | David Goldblatt”

The day England created their own history in shoot-out against Colombia | Barney Ronay


This post is by Barney Ronay from Football | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




In an extract from his new book on Russia 2018, the Guardian’s senior sports writer relives how Eric Dier’s penalty helped fashion ‘a triumph of personality, spirit and good sense’

Mateus Uribe just needs to score and they’re almost there. One more kick to put Colombia 4–2 up, with every penalty after that a bullet for sudden death. Uribe walks from the centre-circle with an unavoidable swagger, product of those bulging thighs. He glances down at the tattoo sleeve on his left arm as he reaches the spot. It has been a meandering journey to this stage for Uribe, a childhood friend of James Rodríguez in Medellín and a late-bloomer as a powerful central midfielder. He plays in Mexico these days, and made his name with a commanding game against France in March when he ran N’Golo Kanté into the ground in the second half. Uribe pauses for a moment, Continue reading “The day England created their own history in shoot-out against Colombia | Barney Ronay”

A hundred days later, has Russia’s $14bn World Cup investment paid off? | Andrew Roth


This post is by Andrew Roth from Football | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The emergence of an unlikely hero and impressive stadiums have bolstered football’s popularity, but there is still work to be done to make the new venues pay for themselves

Russia is not a footballing country, the former trainer for the national side Leonid Slutsky infamously alleged in 2016.

His proof was simple: look at the poor attendance despite billions of rubles poured into new marquee arenas for Spartak and CSKA. “Earlier I was sure that new infrastructure would sharply change people’s relationship to football,” he told Sport Express. “But practice shows that I was wrong.”

Continue reading…

Hugo Lloris is not given the credit he deserves for France’s success


This post is by Adam White and Eric Devin from Football | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Thibaut Courtois won the Golden Glove in Russia and David de Gea was picked in Fifa’s team of the year. What about Lloris?

By Adam White and Eric Devin for Get French Football News

Individual acclaim for a goalkeeper is rare. No goalkeeper has won the Ballon d’Or since Lev Yashin in 1963 and only three keepers – Oliver Kahn in 2002, Gianluigi Buffon in 2006 and Manuel Neuer in 2014 – have made it on to the podium in the last 45 years. All 10 of the players shortlisted for the Fifa player of the year award in September were outfield players. However, over the last week, France captain Hugo Lloris has again underlined his own claim to be recognised for individual awards. After a stunning 2018 for France, he deserves to be considered.

Related: France add to Germany’s woes as Antoine Griezmann leads comeback win

Continue reading…

Hugo Lloris is not given the credit he deserves for France’s success


This post is by Adam White and Eric Devin from Football | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Thibaut Courtois won the Golden Glove in Russia and David de Gea was picked in Fifa’s team of the year. What about Lloris?

By Adam White and Eric Devin for Get French Football News

Individual acclaim for a goalkeeper is rare. No goalkeeper has won the Ballon d’Or since Lev Yashin in 1963 and only three keepers – Oliver Kahn in 2002, Gianluigi Buffon in 2006 and Manuel Neuer in 2014 – have made it on to the podium in the last 45 years. All 10 of the players shortlisted for the Fifa player of the year award in September were outfield players. However, over the last week, France captain Hugo Lloris has again underlined his own claim to be recognised for individual awards. After a stunning 2018 for France, he deserves to be considered.

Related: France add to Germany’s woes as Antoine Griezmann leads comeback win

Continue reading…

Qatar migrant workers are still being exploited, says Amnesty report


This post is by David Conn from Football | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The normalisation of gambling in football | Letter


This post is by Letters from Football | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




The World Cup revealed the extent to which the gambling industry has become embedded in professional sport, writes the bishop of St Albans, Alan SmithIt is right for Simon Stevens of NHS England to highlight the worrying connection between gambling and sports (Report, 6 September). The World Cup revealed the extent to which the gambling industry has become embedded in professional sport. Viewers were presented with more than 60 live-odds betting adverts during the contest. These encouraged people to bet, including the 430,000 problem gamblers in the country.

It’s not just grumpy parents who have had enough of these adverts. This year young people who watched live football complained of seeing too many, with the average 14- to 18-year-old watching 3.8 gambling adverts every day. No wonder many people are worried that this is creating a timebomb as young people are being conditioned to think betting Continue reading “The normalisation of gambling in football | Letter”

From Ibrox abuse to sacking Lopetegui: meet the head of Spain’s FA


This post is by Sid Lowe from Football | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Luis Rubiales, a former Hamilton Academical centre-back, does not hold back in his assessment of football’s image and La Liga’s plans to take a game to the US

The way Luis Rubiales remembers it, the last song dedicated to him in a football stadium ran: “Baldy bastard, what’s the score?” It was August 2009; the man who will be sitting at Wembley on Saturday night, president of the Spanish Football Federation, was playing at centre-back for Hamilton Academical; and the score, Ibrox knew, was 4-1. It was the third game of the season but at the end of it, Rubiales appeared in the press room – “wood panelled, smelling of football from another era” – and announced he was retiring.

It had nothing to do with the result, and he had enjoyed the afternoon. He already knew he was going, his father watching him for the last time from Continue reading “From Ibrox abuse to sacking Lopetegui: meet the head of Spain’s FA”

Mohamed Salah blames Egypt’s FA for World Cup disruptions


This post is by Ruth Michaelson in Cairo from Football | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Liverpool star says celebrities among many disturbances at team’s Chechen training base

The Liverpool and Egypt footballer Mohamed Salah has accused the Egyptian Football Association of hampering the country’s World Cup preparations in Russia earlier this summer by flying in celebrities to the team’s hotel.

In two videos that escalated a months-long row with the EFA, Salah defended a letter sent by his lawyer Ramy Abass that listed seven demands, including increased personal security and regulation of his public appearances and photo opportunities during international competitions.

Continue reading…

Qatar 2022 bid team ‘sabotaged World Cup rivals’


This post is by Press Association from Football | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Mesut Özil quits Germany over ‘racism’ and sparks anger over dual-heritage identity – video


This post is by Football | The Guardian from Football | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Mesut Özil’s departure from Germany’s national team amid accusations of racism is drawing mixed reactions with both expressions of concern over its implications for society and criticism of the player.

The Arsenal player announced on Sunday he was retiring from international football after Germany’s shock first-round World Cup exit. He attacked the country’s football federation (DFB), its president, fans and media for what he saw as double standards in treating people with Turkish roots. Özil, who won 92 caps for Germany, defended his controversial decision to meet with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan in May.

In a statement of its own on Monday, the DFB paid tribute to the midfielder’s contribution but also rejected any suggestions of racism. The governing body stressed its integration work was “of central importance at all levels”.

Özil has received plenty of support on social media, but Bayern Munich president Uli Hoeness accused Özil Continue reading “Mesut Özil quits Germany over ‘racism’ and sparks anger over dual-heritage identity – video”

Mesut Özil walks away from Germany team citing ‘racism and disrespect’


This post is by Tom Bryant from Football | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




• Özil attacks DFB president Reinhard Grindel in statement
• ‘I am German when we win, an immigrant when we lose’

Mesut Özil has blamed unfair discrimination over his meeting with the Turskish president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, in May for his decision to retire from international football with immediate effect.

Özil was a member of the Germany squad that went out of the World Cup finals in Russia at the group stage and faced heavy criticism for his both performances and his meeting with Erdoğan, who has been accused of human rights abuses and has been outspoken about German politics as well.

Continue reading…

Premier League teams face World Cup hangover after abridged pre-season | Paul Wilson


This post is by Paul Wilson from Football | The Guardian


Click here to view on the original site: Original Post




Seven top-tier sides had 10 or more players on international duty in Russia and only Bournemouth and Fulham are training for the new season with complete squads at their disposalWhether it is possible to have too much football is a question frequently asked during World Cup summers, and one which seems likely to raise its head again when the domestic league programme resumes next month.

Related: The rush after Russia – Premier League clubs struggle with new transfer deadline

Continue reading…