VAR edges closer to confirmation for 2018 World Cup

• Ifab recommend video technology be approved for use
• Decision taken in Geneva seen as a crucial seal of approvalVideo Assistant Referees (VAR) took another step towards becoming part and parcel of football after the International Football Association Board (Ifab) recommended they be approved for use. The decision taken in Geneva is seen to be the crucial seal of approval for the technology, which has been the subject of testing for the past two years across 20 football competitions. It will now be rubber-stamped at the Ifab’s AGM in March leaving it certain to be deployed in full at this summer’s World Cup. Continue reading...

Said & Done: ‘What women will put up with is a bit different from guys’

The week in football – also featuring: Coutinho, Fifa and Onésimo Martin Glenn on what the FA learned in 2017: “I think culturally what women will be prepared to put up with has been a bit different from guys. I guess banter would be a case in point.”
• His core message on the FA’s diversity agenda, three months after he called racially discriminatory remarks made by Mark Sampson “inappropriate banter”: “We’re there to set an example.” Continue reading...

Fifa investigates after Rhian Brewster tells of racist abuse in Under-17 World Cup final

• Brewster told Guardian England team-mate Morgan Gibbs-White was abused
• Fifa ‘analysing and gathering evidence’ over alleged incident against SpainFifa has launched an investigation after Rhian Brewster told the Guardian his England team-mate Morgan Gibbs-White was racially abused by a Spanish opponent during the Under-17 World Cup final. Brewster made the allegation in a powerful interview with the Guardian last week. The 17-year-old Liverpool player said he had personally experienced racial abuse or witnessed it on a football pitch seven times, including five occasions in the past seven months. Continue reading...

That Rhian Brewster issued a wake-up call is both worrying and inspiring | Daniel Taylor

By taking a stand over racial abuse he has received, Liverpool’s 17-year-old striker shames those who run the game but offers hope for the next generationIt isn’t easy knowing whether the people occupying football’s ivory towers have actually noted what Rhian Brewster has had to say in the past few days. Unless I have missed it, the executives at Uefa and Fifa have not uttered a word in response and, frankly, that is no surprise whatsoever. Anyone calling Uefa since 22 December would get a cheery answerphone message saying its offices are closed and the lights are out until 4 January. Fifa, meanwhile, is on its own extended Christmas break. “Hope you are not in a hurry,” one of its press aides told me. Related: Liverpool’s Rhian Brewster: ‘When I’m racially abused, I just want to be left alone’ Continue reading...

Fifa trial: ex-president of Peru soccer acquitted of corruption charge

Manuel Burga wept after jurors found him not guilty of a single racketeering conspiracy charge, in a bribery scandal that saw two officials convicted last week A former South American soccer official was acquitted Tuesday of a corruption charge stemming from the Fifa bribery scandal after two others were convicted last week. The acquittal caps a trial in which US prosecutors sought to expose a culture of greed and corruption among the powerful men who oversee the world’s most popular sport. Continue reading...

Fifa trial leaves questions over 2022 Qatar World Cup

Allegations of bribery for 2022 World Cup include names of disgraced former Fifa grandees like Jack Warner and Nicolas Leoz The most stunning and tantalising revelations of the Fifa trial in Brooklyn, New York, had nothing much to do with the two of the three defendants finally hit with guilty verdicts on Friday. They were comparative small fry among football’s financial feeding sharks. Gripping as it turned out to have live, lurid evidence presented of endemic bribery on the sale of television rights for South American tournaments, that wretched, racketeering reality had already been established from the guilty pleas of 23 other football officials from the Americas to a medley of corruption charges. Continue reading...