What next?

Most A-League teams have now demonstrated that they can play the Roar system. If Brisbane wants to grow its fan base it now has to:

1. Take its system to another level.

2. Buy better players that will play the current system better and more consistently.

3. Ensure the squad has a majority of local players (there are about 2 or 3 in there now and sometimes they start with none).

We all hear about 'grassroots' from A-League clubs, well having people involved who are part of the local community is what it means. Letting Matt McKay go, not keeping other locals and former Roar players Dario, Williams (must be injured for Heart?), and not buying John McKain or Josh Rose, has fails to build over 7 years any sense of connection to the Brisbane or Queensland community. Compare that to the Boncos and you will see why Brisbane Continue reading "What next?"

What next?

Most A-League teams have now demonstrated that they can play the Roar system. If Brisbane wants to grow its fan base it now has to:

1. Take its system to another level.

2. Buy better players that will play the current system better and more consistently.

3. Ensure the squad has a majority of local players (there are about 2 or 3 in there now and sometimes they start with none).

We all hear about 'grassroots' from A-League clubs, well having people involved who are part of the local community is what it means. Letting Matt McKay go, not keeping other locals and former Roar players Dario, Williams (must be injured for Heart?), and not buying John McKain or Josh Rose, has fails to build over 7 years any sense of connection to the Brisbane or Queensland community. Compare that to the Boncos and you will see why Brisbane fans are fair weather friends.

Brisbane 1 v Melbourne Heart 2

To build a football brand in Brisbane, the Roar had to win last night. While the crowd had already halved from 20,000 to 10,000, Roy Morgan found this week that Brisbane is the most watched (TV) soccer team in the A-League. A shock for Melbourne Victory perhaps.

That was one disappointment from last night. Another was how the Roar played, possession without opportunities = boredom. And the third was the fake injuries and time wasting from Heart. I don't understand why the ref decided to talk to players rather than just card them.

It is now obvious that without Broich and Henrique, Brisbane are off the pace. No surprise Matt Smith is out for Wednesday's game against Wellington, his very poor game could be explained by injury.

The Roar's owners have told members they want to buy a marquee. Ange has told the press he isn't getting one. Watch this Continue reading "Brisbane 1 v Melbourne Heart 2"

Brisbane 1 v Melbourne Heart 2

To build a football brand in Brisbane, the Roar had to win last night. While the crowd had already halved from 20,000 to 10,000, Roy Morgan found this week that Brisbane is the most watched (TV) soccer team in the A-League. A shock for Melbourne Victory perhaps.

That was one disappointment from last night. Another was how the Roar played, possession without opportunities = boredom. And the third was the fake injuries and time wasting from Heart. I don't understand why the ref decided to talk to players rather than just card them.

It is now obvious that without Broich and Henrique, Brisbane are off the pace. No surprise Matt Smith is out for Wednesday's game against Wellington, his very poor game could be explained by injury.

The Roar's owners have told members they want to buy a marquee. Ange has told the press he isn't getting one. Watch this space for the first signs of 'artistic differences'. Clearly the Roar squad lacks depth and isn't at the same skill level.

Melbourne Heart played the ensemble game better than Roar in the first and were more physical, knocking timid Roar players off the ball.

If the Roar play this way against CCM, expect the score to be 0-4 plus. At least Broich will be back...

Why Carroll Needs Patience and Time


It only takes one bad touch for the criticism to start.  You know that it's coming as soon as Andy Carroll misplaces a pass or fails to control a ball; the comments that he's not worth the money spent on him, how he's a big mistake, that he's too lazy to try and make it work.

You can even sense some wanting him to fail so that they can tell everyone that they told you so.

There is a lesson about not writing players off prematurely in Lucas Leiva's transformation from Liverpool's fall guy into one of the team's most important players. Yet, judging by the negative feeling towards Carroll, there are quite a few who seem unwilling to heed it.

It is undeniable that so far Carroll hasn't really delivered.  Just as there's no arguing that he has struggled to make an impact.  But there have also been enough glimpses of his potential to see that there is something quite interesting there.  That game last season against Manchester City where Carroll scored twice by itself should be enough to convince just how good he could become.

That is hardly surprising.  Carroll has all the characteristics that you could want in a striker: incredible strength, a tremendous shot, virtually unbeatable in the air, the willingness to sacrifice himself for the team and also a good technique.  

Yet in his lack of experience he is missing one very important element.  Barely eighteen months of first team football - most of which were in the Championship - aren't enough for a player to have developed fully.  He still has to learn about his own game as much as anything else.

What has made Carroll's life particularly hard is the £35 million Liverpool paid to get him.  Had he joined for even half of that amount, there would be far greater acceptance and willingness to allow him to grow. But instead people look at the size of the fee and decide that for that kind of money Liverpool should be getting a player who is at the peak of his ability.

Yet he isn't.  The fee was simply a product of the circumstances that preceded the transfer and not really an evaluation of Carroll's value at that point in time.  Liverpool were willing to pay such an inflated amount because they had the cash and wanted to send out a message of their ambition.

But they were also willing to pay it because they believed in Carroll's potential.  The trick with potential, however, is that it can be difficult to coax especially when the player is under pressure.  Young players will go through rough patches, they will make mistakes and they will struggle.  It is all part of the learning process.

That's what's happening to Carroll who has to get used to a team playing in a different manner and with greater expectations then he's been accustomed to.  The potential is definitely there but the pressure is eroding his confidence.  As he doesn't yet have the maturity to deal with it so the problem keeps getting bigger with every game where he disappoints.

It is a vicious cycle that only Carroll himself can break.  Just as Lucas found the inner strength to dig deep and eventually prove his critics wrong, so too must Andy Carroll.  With time hopefully he'll manage to do just that so that Liverpool will finally get the player worthy of all that money they paid for him.

Suarez Hand Gesture to be Investigated by FA

The on field conduct of controversial Liverpool striker Luis Suarez is once again set to be scrutinised by the FA following an incident involving the player during Monday night's Premier League match against Fulham. The Uruguayan striker appeared to "flip the bird" at the home fans following his side's lackluster 1 - 0 defeat at Craven Cottage - a match in which 10 man Liverpool failed to extend their excellent away run in the league.

Suarez is already in hot water with the FA having been charged for allegedly making racist remarks towards Manchester United's Patrice Evra (a charge the player and his club denies) but the FA have confirmed they are now looking into last nights incedent in more detail but are waiting to receive the referees match report before taking stronger actions.